rockwood: (Tome)
Well, I probably can't elaborate on what's actually in it, but I'm happy to say the Serenity RPG supplement, Big Damn Heroes Handbook, is pretty much done with the writing phase and is moving into development. Doesn't mean it's about to hit the shelves or anything, but it's moving! And I've gotta say that I'm really happy with the way it's looking. I liked the recent Serenity Adventures and Six-Shooters & Spaceships, but this one is gonna have all manner of new Traits, optional/updated rules, and so forth. Perhaps I'm biased because I wrote chunks of this one, but it really does move the game along nicely, while the other two supplements mostly provided new content.

Also, this video is amazing (but unrelated); be sure to watch til the end, especially if you're not a fan of Windows:


Video link in case the embed doesn't work.

Blessed be,
~Nathan

rockwood: (Default)
This is the fourth in a series of fairly lengthy articles, the first of which can be found here.

This article will deal with some of the differences in the combat systems of the Serenity RPG and the Cortex engine; specifically, the rules regarding multiple actions.

DISCLAIMER: I'm not the owner of Serenity, the Serenity RPG, or the Cortex System. While I wrote a good portion of the later Cortex books (BSG, Demon Hunters, and the generic Core Book included), I'm just a freelancer. The opinions expressed in these articles are my own. When it comes to the design philosophy I discuss, I try to present what I understand to be the 'general consensus' of the Cortex developers and the design goals of the owners, Margaret Weis Productions.

If you want to learn more, read on!



That's one of my favorite rule-system changes to the Cortex engine, so I'm especially looking forward to any feedback or criticism on this one. If you have any questions, feel free to ask them! Also, I'm running out of ideas for subjects to address in this series of articles, so suggestions are welcome on that front as well.

Blessed be,
~Nathan
rockwood: (Default)
This is the third in a series of fairly lengthy articles, the first of which can be found here.

This article will deal with the differences in the way Plot Points and Advancement Points are handled between the Serenity RPG and the Cortex engine as it appears in later games.

DISCLAIMER: I'm not the owner of Serenity, the Serenity RPG, or the Cortex System. While I wrote a good portion of the later Cortex books (BSG, Demon Hunters, and the generic Core Book included), I'm just a freelancer. The opinions expressed in these articles are my own. When it comes to the design philosophy I discuss, I try to present what I understand to be the 'general consensus' of the Cortex developers and the design goals of the owners, Margaret Weis Productions.

If you're interested, read on!



Well, I hope that answers some questions or provokes some thoughts! Next time I'll look at combat (finally moving away from character creation!).

Looking forward to any comments, criticisms, or questions.

Blessed be,
~Nathan
rockwood: (Default)
This is the second part of a series of fairly lengthy posts, the first of which can be found here.

This article will deal with the changes made to the Trait system between the Serenity RPG and the Cortex engine as it appears in later games.

DISCLAIMER: I'm not the owner of Serenity, the Serenity RPG, or the Cortex System. While I wrote a good portion of the later Cortex books (BSG, Demon Hunters, and the generic Core Book included), I'm just a freelancer. The opinions expressed in these articles are my own. When it comes to the design philosophy I discuss, I try to present what I understand to be the 'general consensus' of the Cortex developers and the design goals of the owners, Margaret Weis Productions.

I hope this proves useful to someone! Enjoy.



I hope my writing isn't so rambling as to lose your interest. If anyone is still paying attention, the next article will be on Plot Points and Advancement Points---the last article on character creation and advancement. After that, I'll look at combat and rule systems.

As before, comments, questions, and criticism is welcome---both regarding the game design, and the writing of the post. Thanks for reading!

Blessed be,
~Nathan
rockwood: (Tome)
One thing that I always get asked is how, exactly,  the Serenity RPG differs from the later editions of the Cortex system. So I thought I'd start off my jabbering here on LJ with a more in-depth discussion of those differences than I usually give.

In this series of articles, I'll cover not just the changes implemented between Serenity and the Cortex revisions, but also some of the motivations and the design philosophy that led to those changes. I'll also be happy to take questions on such things, but...

DISCLAIMER: I'm not the owner of Serenity, the Serenity RPG, or the Cortex System. While I wrote a good portion of the later Cortex books (BSG, Demon Hunters, and the generic Core Book included), I'm just a freelancer. The opinions expressed in these articles are my own. When it comes to the design philosophy I discuss, I try to present what I understand to be the 'general consensus' of the Cortex developers and the design goals of the owners, Margaret Weis Productions.

Warning, this is a long and detailed article. Hope you enjoy it!


Now, all that said, those aren't the only changes made to the way character generation and advancement work between Serenity and the later Cortex revisions. Next time (tomorrow, hopefully), I'll go over the changes to the Trait system. After that we'll look at Plot Points and Advancement Points, and then we'll be on to other aspects of the games.

Hope this little series of articles will prove helpful to some folk. Questions? Comments? Criticisms?

Blessed be,
~Nathan
rockwood: (Default)
Ok, well---after browsing around a bit, it seems there's enough gaming/Serenity interest to be drummed up to at least justify my blathering on those accounts. So I'll be posting a bit, soon, about the Cortex system's design and revisions, especially as related to gaming in the 'verse.

Also, I've got some schemes on the back burner; mostly for what to do with the system once the generic Cortex Corebook comes out. Since MWP has said that they'll most likely be letting third party publishers sell their own material with certain restrictions, I hope I can hop on that bandwagon pretty quick and get a sourcebook out. Some ideas are

--A game based on the novel I hope to write shortly (woot for easily achievable goals! /sarcasm), which would make it a pseudo-victorian fantasy mod I'm tentatively calling 'deathpunk.'

--A modern horror game based on the works of H. P. Lovecraft, primarily regarding a well-funded organization that has set itself up in the ruins of a burned out ghost town on the Massachusetts coast. They call themselves "The Innsmouth Project," and organize government investigations into supernatural happenings within the States. Of course, not all their operatives can avoid the...uncanny effects of The Call, but some casualties in the line of duty are to be expected.

More to come later, I'm sure. The problem with game design is that you just keep getting ideas which you have no time to implement... it can be excruciatingly frustrating. Just goes to show I really need that direct neural uplink. Scientists! Get on it!

Blessed be,
~Nathan

Profile

rockwood: (Default)
rockwood

September 2015

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13 141516171819
202122232425 26
27282930   

Most Popular Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags